London squatter talks

TONY MAHONY is head of the campaign for clearing hostels and slums. This co-ordinates and publicises all the squatting campaigns taking place in Britain. At present there are five in London and many others in the North, notably in Manchester. For a national organiser of the most militant and successful left-wing campaigns in Britain, Tony has an unusual background. He was educated in a Jesuit school in London and proceeded to study for the priesthood for a few years. For a reason which he claims is incomprehensible to him he had chosen to be a Carmelite monk in Aylesford Priory in Kent.

A real crisis this time?

THE PUBLICATION of the next quarterly report on the economy by the Economic and Social Research Institute --expected within the next few weeksis awaited with more than the usual amount of interest. Psychologically, the report will mark the end of the Summer doldrums in economic affairs caused, as in most other aspects of political life, by the anti-climax of the June election and the disappearance of Ministers, Civil Servants, and economic commentators to their various holiday hideaways.

Ireland's own Enoch Powell

IRELAND HAS thrown up at last its own version of Enoch Powell-in the person of Oliver J. Flanagan, T.D. As usual, the replica is a pale tawdry imitation of the real thing.

The men on the moon

"ONE SMALL STEP for man, one giant leap for mankind." With words reminiscent of a children's game, Commander Neil Armstrong, at the culmination of a 204 thousand million dollar effort, took man's first step on the Moon. Does this association of ideas set the true tone of this achievement-a step in a game for children or is there something more?

Christy O'Connor and the 'open'

THE BRITISH OPEN GOLF Championship has been given such diverse descriptions as "the greatest golf show on earth" and "an anachronism". Antique it most certainly is, an anachronism it most certainly is not and like most antiques, it is eagerly sought and valued highly. In fact, the most prized title in golf.

Tommy Wade and Irish Show Jumping

THE R.D.S. SHOW JUMPING ARENA, August, 1967. A diminutive horse and a tight-lipped rider appear for their second round in the Nations' Cup. Twenty-two faults in their first round and a fall for the rider at the eleventh jump should have severely rattled their cO:1fidence. But, with icy calm and determination they approached each obstacle, willed on by an excited but tense and silent crowd. At a couple of fences the top pole trembled, but none fell. Finally, horse and rider sailed over the last jump for a clear round as wild cheering greeted the terse announcement of R.D.S.

Confrontation at Church

CHURCH IS IN FACT a good place for a confrontation. History and geography have made it a meeting point of the Germanic and Latin cultures. It is of course very much the Swjiss-German tourist town with plenty of good SwissGerman money in the bank-one had hoped to surprise a gnome or two taking time off from Zurich-but Italian-speaking Ticino is near, and Italy itself is not alone near but very much present, in the faces and speech of the hotel staffs who come for the season to earn a year's pay.

Religion-The Knights of Columbanus

AFTER THREE YEARS as Supreme Knight of the 6,000 Knights of Saint Columbanus, the term of office of Vincent Grogan, S.c., has come to an end. He says he doesn't intend ever to hold any official rank in any organisation, apart from his existing commitment to the Council for the Laity, of which he is this year's Chairman, because in future he wishes to be free to speak openly and frankly on all matters concerning the Catholic Church. Certainly he spoke frankly to NUSIGHT about the Knights and his three years' of office.

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